Saturday, 3 August 2013

A Tutorial of Sorts....Hexagon Blanket Border



I've had a few people, well actually more than a few ask me about the border on my hexie blanket....most of you that hang around here will know I don't like blankets with wavy edges....I like to make them straight....and I know I'm not alone, so I made this up as I went along using the theory of different crochet stitches have different lengths so you can always fill most gaps.

I attempted to do a tutorial on how I did this border, but time has got away so I'll do my best to explain to you in a basic form.  Those of you that crochet will probably understand, for those of you that don't, I apologise and when I have more time, I'll attempt to do it a bit better. You Tube is great for assisting you with the stitches I talk about so you may just find it falls into place.

The first thing that I do is always change my hook down half a size from what I made the blanket with.  So I used Baby Cashmerino yarn for this blanket and used a 3.5mm hook, so I created the border with a 3.00 mm hook....this just stops the border from being loose and getting that wavy, too many stitches look about it.

I've photographed the corner of the blanket completed so you know how I got around the corner and also how I filled those zig, zag gaps on the left of the blanket... and filling the half hexies across the top is easy, and here is a good phototutorial right here


























Firstly I used the burnt orange yarn and starting on a straight edge and crocheting into a space in the previous row between 2 double crochet stitches I went the whole way around the blanket doing a single crochet stitch (US terms) and then 3 chains, then a single crochet, then 3 chains into the gaps left by the edges of all the hexies.  I repeated this the whole way around the blanket apart from where the hexie corners stuck out, then I did 1 single crochet then 1 chain stitch and then1 single crochet.  I've marked these stitches in the photo below with green arrows. 

When doing this I also made sure that I did the single crochet in the space over the join where the two hexagons are joined together if that makes sense.  I highlighted this with the royal blue arrows. The pink arrows are just to highlight where I did my single crochets on the half hexagons. Again I did most of these over the joins of the two colours and in the centre circle.  Continue around the whole blanket joining with a slip stitch.



























Now the next row crocheted in turquoise blue is the difficult one but after this it's a breeze. I say difficult because I did have to use my noggin' here and think this out.

I found this picture below on Pinterest and this is what got me through, and I will link it back here to the owner of Tinking Turtles blog as she's done all the hard work for us by providing the picture.































Basically what you are doing now is filling the gaps with stitches.   Now starting on the straight edge is the easiest and just work clusters of  3 double crochet stitches marked with the purple arrows in the photo below.  You are doing these stitches in the space you created by making the 3 chains in burnt orange on the previous row. Keep going till you get to your first corner  You will finish your last cluster where the green arrow is.

Now you'll create the corner where the red arrow is.  The first cluster is 3 double crochet stitches marked with the yellow arrow and then do 2 chains to create a space in the corner, marked with a red arrow, then marked with the royal blue arrow I did 3 treble stitches. That's the corner completed.


























Moving to the next cluster of stitches in the photo below.  Marked with a green arrow into this chain 3 space you do 2 double crochets stitches and 1 half double crochet, and then the next stitch marked with a pink arrow you do 2 half double crochet and 1 single crochet stitches.  Now do 2 chain stitches marked with red arrow and work backwards following the instructions again for the pink and green arrows.



























Next bit is doing the 2 clusters in the dip of the zig zag, marked in black in the photo below. Each stitch is made up of 3 treble/triple clusters....and I'm going to be quite honest here, on the odd occasion on the 2 inside stitches I did a double treble stitch because it needed a some extra length, not often just sometimes.






Keep going all the way around your blanket using the above instructions and join with a slip stitch to where you started.


The remainder is easy,  changing to apricot yarn, just do your single crochet and 3 chains all over again, the only difference this time is when you get to the corner do 2 chains in between your 2 single crochets.  Marked in pink in the photo below.





The next row in dark teal blue is just back to 3 double crochets in each apricot chain 3 space.  This is just like doing a granny square, and again just do a normal granny square corner and do a 2 chain space in that corner.

Next row was mustard and back to doing what you did for the apricot row, all the way around.  Then bright turquoise, same as the dark teal blue row, and lastly a row of jaffa orange in single crochet all the way around to complete

Done!!


I do apologise that all the terminology is in US stitches, but that's the way I roll.   Here is a link to the UK terminology so you can to the comparison.

I will state again as I have previously on my blog, I'm not an experienced crocheter.  I'm self taught....I'm a knitter through and through but I like to dabble with crochet every now and again.

If you need any help with the above I'll do my best to assist.

The last step is to block your work on completion. I block the overall blanket rather than square by square, this is a must and this will straighten out your border if it's a bit tight and just give your work a professional finish and it also relaxes the fibres of the wool and your work becomes all soft and drapey rather than tight and stiff.

Lastly this tute above is not set in concrete, use it as a guide, because different plys of yarns will give different results, so if you don't think you need a treble stitch where I've put it and your stitch needs to be a bit shorter make it a double stitch instead....don't be scared of crochet it's fun, easy and  you can pull out stitches without having to unravel miles of yarn if you've made an error, crochet is a lot more forgiving....unlike knitting!!

Anyway best of luck if you choose to do a similar border as mine and as long as you fill the gaps you can do any number of different stitches to create a world of different edgings.








Here is the link to my blanket on Ravelry


Thanks





37 comments:

  1. Hello! Your blanket's really lovely, and the edging is perfect. Thanks for a lovely tutorial.

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  2. So thoughtful of you to take the time for the tutorial!

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  3. Thank-you so much, I loved this border. Will definitely being using it next time I make a hexagon blanket. :)

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    1. A hexagon is always a fun blanket to make. Vx

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  4. this is so b e a u t i f u l. i really love your colour combinations.
    x epipa

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  5. Hi Karen from MixTure43 here, this is a beautiful blanket, gorgeous colours and thank you for the tutorial, really helpful. Take a look at my blog mix-ture43/typepad, if you get chance and ny FB page mixtur43. I would love to see you there! Thanks for sharing.
    Karen :o)xx

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    1. Hi Karen, I have been over to your page and have a look and I have subscribed to your newsfeed, lovely work and lovely photos. kindest Vicki

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  6. Hi friend, I have a blog about the arts in general, a Agulha e tricot by Tita Carré, already visited?
    have an interest in exchanging links with you, it works well, I put your link on the sidebar of my blog
      and you put my link in your sidebar, if you have interest please contact me, hugs.
    http://www.titacarre.com

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  7. How do you block a large blanket? Could you write a paragraph or two on blocking, particularly something of that size. Thanks.

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    1. Next time I have a blanket to block, I'll write something up and take some pictures and then do a post. Thanks Vx

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    2. Ok....thanks. I had heard that you block on a large board, but if it's a 36 x 36 inch blanket, then it would require such a large board. I suppose one could block on carpet on one's floor. :-) However you do it, I would love to know!

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  8. Thanks so much for this, you have saved me hours of unraveling and tearing my hair out trying to figure it out for myself. I'm eagerly awaiting the arrival of some yarn from your de-stash market (and two clover hats). I might be able to add some of that yarn to my hex blanket - can't wait.

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    1. Hi Katherine, Just to let you know I was going to email you today, but you've saved me....I had to re-knit the little green hat of yours as I urgently needed the one I had completed for a photo shoot in the US for my knitting patterns....I am finishing the second one now as we speak, so your yarn and your hats will be expressed to you tomorrow. Thanks for your patience. Looking forward to seeing all that yarn put to good use. Vx

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    2. No worries, I understand :)

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    3. I just love your blanket. I think what draws me to it is the colors you chose. It's so bright and cheerful. I wish I knew how to crochet. Your work must be so tedious. Do you ever sell your work? thank you for making the world a little bit more beautiful.

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    4. Hi Joan, I do sell my work, I run my business on Etsy, the link is under my welcome details on the top right hand side of my page. The link is the "E" that will take you there. thanks Vicki

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  9. I really like the way that the hexagons are joined, rather than sew together as usual, the process or pattern that you have given is wonderful. I can't wait to show the ladies at my church, "Loving Hands". We make hats & scarves every year for little ones at Christmas time, and in between, we make blankets all sizes for those in need of them, especially those who are in Nursing Homes, and for our Troops overseas. Thank you for your generosity of giving this wonderful pattern.

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  10. Love it - thanks! Haven't made a hexie blanket, but it's given me inspiration for the border of the knitted blanket I've just finished stitching! Might try a crocheted hexie next time round! Happy to have discovered your blog!

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  11. Love your border and thanks so much for the tutorial I think I will be referring back here in the months to come. Also in love with your colour choices for this blanket it has filled me with inspiration for my next project!

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    1. My pleasure, good luck with the new project. It's always fun and exciting starting something new. Vx

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    2. Me again! I was wondering approximately how much yarn you used in the border? What were the dimensions of your blanket and how many yards do you think the border took? I am trying to place my final yarn order for my hexie and I am having a dickens of a time estimating how much to get I do not want to be short as I have a time restriction on finishing it and can't afford to run out at the last minute and wait for more yarn to arrive.

      Thanks so much again!

      - J

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    3. sorry I didn't keep that sort of information. I have a huge stash of yarn here so when choosing colours for a border I normally make sure I have a full ball to go around a baby blanket once.....and I don't know the dimensions of the blanket I'm afraid, this blanket was sold some time ago.

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  12. Please can I just have this blanket?
    :-)
    I saw a photo in Pinterest, and that sway my decision to use this pattern for a secret my sis and I are doing...almost the same colours, incidentally. I love what you've done.

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  13. Can you share half hexagon pattern? i have seen only charts
    would be happy if you help me as i cannot understand charts
    thank you

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    1. Yes if you re read the first part of the post there is a hyperlink to a pictorial of another crocheter that has done this. It's in the last paragraph before the main picture. Thanks Vicki

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  14. Hola de nuevo, quería invitarte a mí blog para q vieras como ha quedado mi colcha, y darte las gracias otra vez por tu tutorial. Lo he hecho exactamente igual que tu colcha de hexágonos y además he puesto tu enlace. Un saludo.

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  15. I can't express how much I appreciate this tutorial! I made a a blanket of hexagon granny squares and couldn't figure out how to square off the edges. none of the other tutorials I found worked with my pattern - the end result looked odd. With your method, my blanket looks wonderful! Thank you!

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Thank you for taking the time to leave a comment, They are all read and very much appreciated. Except for spam, they're reported to blogger and google+ Vicki x